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Jessica-Dobson-Micah
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Lord Have Your Way

And Lo we know what you require
Its written plainly in your word
these idle hands do not defend
those who are poor and fatherless

No i’ve seen a great light
I still want your love but I don’t want to die
Now i’ve seen a great light
so hard to say Lord have your way

You see the wicked hands of man
deliver up our offerings
they are divided, such a stench
they are not filled with humbleness

No i’ve seen a great light
I still want your love but I don’t want to die
Now i’ve seen a great light
so hard to say Lord have your way

Lord have your way

The artist: Jessica Dobson

Micah was a lone voice warning of approaching judgment. His audience, the kingdom of Judah, looked around and saw only peace and prosperity on the horizon. However, as has been observed in other ages closer to our own, Micah saw that as the rich got richer, the poor got poorer.

Micah was a lone voice warning of approaching judgment. His audience, the kingdom of Judah, looked around and saw only peace and prosperity on the horizon. However, as has been observed in other ages closer to our own, Micah saw that as the rich got richer, the poor got poorer. In fact, he saw that counter to God’s wishes the rich were getting richer specifically through the exploitation of the poor. His message speaks what he knew, that the God who identifies as the defender of the weak (1) and the father to the fatherless (2) would not stand idly by and let their crimes go unpunished.

The wealthy were constantly devising schemes to disinherit the poor (3). So God devised disaster (4) and disinheritance (5) for them. They were turning women and children out on the street so they would be turned out of the land (6). The leaders of Israel should have put a stop to these practices but instead they became complicit in the crimes of the rich. Those who existed for the sake of justice (7) instead had become like cannibals, devouring the people they were to protect (8). The prophets spoke in favor of the rich because they dined at their tables (9). The kings built the wealth of the capitol with blood (10). The judges took bribes and even the priests of God were for hire (11). They believed they were safe from judgment as the people of God, but their destructive worship of wealth would bring God to lay them flat (12).

The wicked of Judah may have been able to buy off the leaders, but they could not buy off God. No amount of sacrifice, no matter how numerous, nor costly (13) could satisfy Gods requirements.

God had already made his demands known and Micah restates them in wonderful simplicity:

He has told you, O man what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice,
and to love kindness,

and to walk humbly with your God (14).

Their greed and oppression didn’t just displease God; it fell short of what they owed him.

Despite Micah’s strong presentation of coming and inescapable judgment, he also sees beautiful things beyond. The book easily breaks into three sections (15). Each section follows the same pattern: starting with a call to hear (16), and ending with a blessing (17). Micah promises that God will bring tremendous prosperity, but this time without oppression and wickedness, this wealth will come from obedience to God (18). Part of God’s plan for this to happen calls for new leadership. The shepherds of Judah had failed, so God would raise up his own (19). This shepherd would not come from among the elite or the place of power but instead from the insignificant town of Bethlehem (20). Despite the failure of God’s people to give Him what they owed, and the fact that wickedness had spread through

all the people (21), somehow through this Shepherd God would bring about his promises (22), and provide forgiveness (23) for their sins. Their wickedness had brought about judgment, but it could not interfere in the good plans of God.